Picturing Change is ART WORKS Projects' annual photo auction fundraiser. Proceeds from the event and auction help fund our work using design and the arts to raise awareness of and educate the public about global human rights issues.

Randall Hyman photographed the Norwegian Arctic as an Independent Fulbright Scholar and on subsequent travels.

Randall Hyman photographed the Norwegian Arctic as an Independent Fulbright Scholar and on subsequent travels.

0 notes

Another beautiful photo! This one is by David Bowman

Another beautiful photo! This one is by David Bowman

0 notes

We are thrilled to add this stunning picture of tobacco workers to our auction. Photo by Eli Reichman.

We are thrilled to add this stunning picture of tobacco workers to our auction. Photo by Eli Reichman.

0 notes

Raccoon Mountain Pumped Storage Plant Outflow, Tennessee River, Chattanooga, Tennessee, 2010
Watershed Series by Jeffrey Rich
  “In Watershed, I intended to highlight this relationship between land, water, and man within the Mississippi River watershed, the largest watershed in North America. Every watershed is made up of smaller watersheds or basins, and the Southern portion of the Mississippi Watershed is made up of three major river basins, The French Broad River, The Tennessee River and The Mississippi River. Each of these basins forms a chapter of the Watershed project.  The second chapter of the Watershed project examines the Tennessee River Basin, a system of rivers that sits in the heart of the South. Covering portions of seven states, this narrative traces the path of the rivers from the prominent dams and vistas of Appalachia, though the Tennessee Valley to the industrial landscapes of the Cumberland Plateau all the way up to the Ohio River. This path reveals how 80 years of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the New Deal era government organization created to provide flood relief, spur economic development, and produce electric power, have ultimately changed the nature of the Basin. The rivers of the Tennessee Watershed, once unpredictable and wild, have been developed into controlled reservoirs ready for recreation, commercial barge navigation, and power production.”

Raccoon Mountain Pumped Storage Plant Outflow, Tennessee River, Chattanooga, Tennessee, 2010

Watershed Series by Jeffrey Rich


“In Watershed, I intended to highlight this relationship between land, water, and man within the Mississippi River watershed, the largest watershed in North America. Every watershed is made up of smaller watersheds or basins, and the Southern portion of the Mississippi Watershed is made up of three major river basins, The French Broad River, The Tennessee River and The Mississippi River. Each of these basins forms a chapter of the Watershed project. 

The second chapter of the Watershed project examines the Tennessee River Basin, a system of rivers that sits in the heart of the South. Covering portions of seven states, this narrative traces the path of the rivers from the prominent dams and vistas of Appalachia, though the Tennessee Valley to the industrial landscapes of the Cumberland Plateau all the way up to the Ohio River. This path reveals how 80 years of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the New Deal era government organization created to provide flood relief, spur economic development, and produce electric power, have ultimately changed the nature of the Basin. The rivers of the Tennessee Watershed, once unpredictable and wild, have been developed into controlled reservoirs ready for recreation, commercial barge navigation, and power production.”

1 note

Triptych by Judith Guajardo

Triptych by Judith Guajardo

0 notes

 
A photo by Barbara A. Diener, from her series Sehnsucht
Artist’s Statement:
Sehnsucht is a German compound word derived from yearning (das Sehnen) and addiction (die Sucht). But even when considered together, these words cannot adequately translate the full meaning. It is a longing for someone or something that cannot be fully defined and will not be found.
It is hard to define the abstract feeling of comfort one equates with home. Initially motivated by a longing for this feeling, I made these photographs in small towns and rural communities in the United States and Europe that are demographically similar to the town in Germany where I grew up. The focus of this project has shifted to the communities in towns that are maintained despite a disappearing rural lifestyle. My photographs do not merely document but rather translate the ritualistic and spiritual undercurrent of these places into concrete visual representations. The somberness of the inhabitants in these photographs is balanced by the beauty of the landscape, discouraging a one-sided understanding of them. The landscape becomes a character itself and represents the pride in the land I have encountered in my subjects.

These villages are as complex as the sense of rootedness I am searching for and the deliberate linking of disparate subjects (portraits, landscapes, interiors) mirrors this. My attraction to the rural does not only stem from my upbringing. There is a quietude to this environment that strips away distractions and amplifies the inevitable cycles of life. The people in my photographs exist in their own world and this spatial and emotional distance functions as a reminder that these places remain impermeable and the comfort I am searching for is indeed elusive.

 

A photo by Barbara A. Diener, from her series Sehnsucht

Artist’s Statement:

Sehnsucht is a German compound word derived from yearning (das Sehnen) and addiction (die Sucht). But even when considered together, these words cannot adequately translate the full meaning. It is a longing for someone or something that cannot be fully defined and will not be found.

It is hard to define the abstract feeling of comfort one equates with home. Initially motivated by a longing for this feeling, I made these photographs in small towns and rural communities in the United States and Europe that are demographically similar to the town in Germany where I grew up. The focus of this project has shifted to the communities in towns that are maintained despite a disappearing rural lifestyle. My photographs do not merely document but rather translate the ritualistic and spiritual undercurrent of these places into concrete visual representations. The somberness of the inhabitants in these photographs is balanced by the beauty of the landscape, discouraging a one-sided understanding of them. The landscape becomes a character itself and represents the pride in the land I have encountered in my subjects.

These villages are as complex as the sense of rootedness I am searching for and the deliberate linking of disparate subjects (portraits, landscapes, interiors) mirrors this. My attraction to the rural does not only stem from my upbringing. There is a quietude to this environment that strips away distractions and amplifies the inevitable cycles of life. The people in my photographs exist in their own world and this spatial and emotional distance functions as a reminder that these places remain impermeable and the comfort I am searching for is indeed elusive.

0 notes

Our next photo is by Lauren Grabelle!Going Away From The Sun Road, Glacier National ParkSlideluck is currently featuring her work at Photoville. You can read more here.

Our next photo is by Lauren Grabelle!
Going Away From The Sun Road, Glacier National Park

Slideluck is currently featuring her work at Photoville. You can read more here.

0 notes

This is an image from Dave Jordano’s “Duck Blinds” series.
"Resting in the shallow waters along the banks of the Mississippi River, these ubiquitous structures are common along the northwestern shores of Illinois. Existing for years as permanent structures, hunters were required to register their locations and pay an annual fee for their use. Their numbers are closely monitored by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and they are all made of natural materials. Recently, the DNR has banned their use and all of these structures must be dismantled before the next hunting season. Permits will be used for new temporary structures, but now much less impact on the environment will there be (if any at all) if hunters have to dismantle and rebuild them every year?

What I found interesting was how each blind possessed a style and character all its own, distinctly different and unique, while each hunter has to adhere to the same basic principles of construction using similar building materials. The end results, while utilitarian in purpose, are always playfully creative and original. These photographs are an homage to their individuality.”
See more on his website.

This is an image from Dave Jordano’s “Duck Blinds” series.

"Resting in the shallow waters along the banks of the Mississippi River, these ubiquitous structures are common along the northwestern shores of Illinois. Existing for years as permanent structures, hunters were required to register their locations and pay an annual fee for their use. Their numbers are closely monitored by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and they are all made of natural materials. Recently, the DNR has banned their use and all of these structures must be dismantled before the next hunting season. Permits will be used for new temporary structures, but now much less impact on the environment will there be (if any at all) if hunters have to dismantle and rebuild them every year?

What I found interesting was how each blind possessed a style and character all its own, distinctly different and unique, while each hunter has to adhere to the same basic principles of construction using similar building materials. The end results, while utilitarian in purpose, are always playfully creative and original. These photographs are an homage to their individuality.”

See more on his website.

0 notes

"2096 - Milwaukee, Wisconsin" from photographer Carl Corey's “Habitat” series.

"2096 - Milwaukee, Wisconsin" from photographer Carl Corey's “Habitat” series.

1 note

The first photo for Picturing Change’s 2014 auction is from the series “Controlled Burn at Ferry Bluff” by Jill Metcoff. This photo will be featured in Metcoff’s upcoming book FIRELINES.
Artist Statement: “I am captivated by the sight of fire; the speed of its trip through the landscape, its dance through plants and trees, the swirling white wraiths it leaves behind resembling morning fog.
The Ancients celebrated the mystery of fire: while it destroys, it replenishes; where it burns, plants flourish. Today fire in controlled burns enhances land management, reducing invasive species and nurturing biodiversity.
The first meadow burn I photographed was my own six acre prairie restoration. Since then, for the past four years it has been my privilege to accompany highly trained ‘burn teams’ as they worked in Midwestern fields, prairies and upland forests. We forged an understanding that as long as I wouldn’t get in their way they’d allow me to stand in the thick of things, lugging my tripod and large 6x17cm panorama, creating images of fire in unpeopled landscapes.
I have developed hands-in-the-dirt closeness to prairie and combined it with more than thirty years experience behind the lens and in the darkroom. As an artist I am nourished by fire and the land.”

The first photo for Picturing Change’s 2014 auction is from the series “Controlled Burn at Ferry Bluff” by Jill Metcoff. This photo will be featured in Metcoff’s upcoming book FIRELINES.

Artist Statement: “I am captivated by the sight of fire; the speed of its trip through the landscape, its dance through plants and trees, the swirling white wraiths it leaves behind resembling morning fog.

The Ancients celebrated the mystery of fire: while it destroys, it replenishes; where it burns, plants flourish. Today fire in controlled burns enhances land management, reducing invasive species and nurturing biodiversity.

The first meadow burn I photographed was my own six acre prairie restoration. Since then, for the past four years it has been my privilege to accompany highly trained ‘burn teams’ as they worked in Midwestern fields, prairies and upland forests. We forged an understanding that as long as I wouldn’t get in their way they’d allow me to stand in the thick of things, lugging my tripod and large 6x17cm panorama, creating images of fire in unpeopled landscapes.

I have developed hands-in-the-dirt closeness to prairie and combined it with more than thirty years experience behind the lens and in the darkroom. As an artist I am nourished by fire and the land.”

0 notes